AN
ANGOLAN
ARCHIVE



FINAL PROJECT BA FASHION PRINT  @ CENTRAL SAINT MARTINS

   
Online Degree show :  https://bafcsm.com/portfolios/sandra-poulson

Online Video Show case:  https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=y-6BHM3ljxE
(Watch ‘The Ladder’ video performance at 05min03sec)


Online Press ID MAGAZINE -VICE  https://i-d.vice.com/en_uk/article/v7gbkd/students-central-saint-martins-graduates-2020

Online Press US VOGUE:  https://www.vogue.com/article/central-saint-martins-2020-graduate-collections

Online Press CSM- UAL   https://www.arts.ac.uk/colleges/central-saint-martins/stories/fashion-poulson/_nocache?utm_campaign=later-linkinbio-csm_news&utm_content=later-8293357&utm_medium=social&utm_source=instagram

Online Press - Fashion Open Studio - Fashion Revoluution -   https://www.instagram.com/fashionopenstudio/   






This work is an archival piece of information explored through documents, artefacts, garments, moments, headlines, oral tradition, historical data, that define the sociocultural, economic, political, ethnic and cultural landscape of Angola, focusing in Luanda. It operates as an instigator for action towards progress by creating an opportunity for individual agency for one to ‘discuss their own story’ and by all means tell it.

AN ANGOLAN ARCHIVE  (AAA) is an assemblage of around 200 pieces of information in the form of written texts, research images, garments, voice recordings, drawings, wood artefacts, installation, photography, performance and video works. This is an on-going project that similarly to my practice in general, utilizes a selection of common household Angolan items to discuss the relationship between family and inherited societal memory from colonial Angola and the civil war. Aiming to dismantle contemporary Angola through semiotics studies of such ordinary objects as actors in cultural and political on-going transformations. Here all items are studies not only in a material level, but mostly in a material culture perspective. What is the individual’s/society relationship with the material information?

The task of decoloniality is central to this work, as the notion of African led own Archives is still to confront the current realities being depicted by external bodies.

It is important to mention that this work has now been developed for around a year having experienced the world health crisis of Covid-19 and the current also globally changing fight for the end of racial constructs and discrimination within the West.

The world changes and it is crucial to change the narratives.